Machine Learning for Trading

Machine Learning for Trading

Machine Learning for Stock Trading, Forex Trading, Daytrading or even long-term investing is already here. You can opt to use a fee-based or performance based service and let them manage your money.

If, on the other hand, you are an active investor or trader, you might want to develop your own trading system with your own unique insights. This tutorial will shortly lay out the landscape of such a system. Also, in our On-Demand Course (Machine Learning for Trading) you can learn how to develop such a system on your own.

Data Source / API

First, you need data. Data is key for a machine learning System. Without proper data, nothing else matters. You can get free data from your broker (like Oanda). But with that data your chances to build a profitable system are slim.

It’s therefore advised to make use of paid alternative data. Such data can cost anywhere from 99$ per month to 4999$ per month or even higher. (Example: https://www.quandl.com/alternative-data)

Database

You’ll need to have your own database. For one, you want to save the data you pay for. You also want to save the manipulated data you create (e.g. when you compute the moving average or similar indicators). Also, you need to keep track of your trades, wins, losses, etc.

For this you want to use MySQL or NoSQL (MongoDB) database. If you don’t want to operate and manage a Database yourself, you should take a look at AWS RDS and Goole Cloud SQL Services. They’ll make your life easier in this aspect.

Machine Learning System

This is the actual brain of you system, the one that decides what to do with the incoming chunk of data from your data provider. Do you execute a trade? Do you close a current one? Do you do just nothing?

Your system can be a supervised machine learning model (like a neural net) or it can be an autonomous agent (see: Reinforcement Learning). The latter is gaining momentum in the algorithmic trading scene.

You want to host your system on a performant but most importantly a reliable Computing Machine. Here again, I advise you to use a Cloud Service (AWS EC2, Google Cloud Computer, MS Azure, …).

Backtest

Before you unleash your system onto your real account, you want backtest it. For this you need your own backtesting system or use a library for that (Example: https://pypi.org/project/backtrader/). Only after a backtest seems to be promising, should you release the system onto your demo account. And only after that onto your real account.

Execute Calls (Buy, Close, Change SL)

This is where the magic hits the real world. You need to keep a close eye on your system. If it fails for a few hours and you don’t notice it, it might leave a short trade that should have been closed. Automatic Alerts are a common thing in the Cloud Service Providers – they’ll even notify you via SMS.

Also, since your System will be running on the servers, without any User Interface, you should think about how you will get a current statement of your account. Maybe you have to build one yourself. Maybe your Broker has one.

How to build modern Websites in 2020?

How to build modern Websites in 2020?

It’s 2020 and you want to learn how to create beautiful and modern websites in 2020? This Article will serve as a guide on what you should be looking into, in order to learn to build fast and beautiful websites. We’ll also mention some keyword for technologies with potential, which you can look into.

What is a Website in 2020?

A question that simple shouldn’t be asked in 2020, right? But the lines between Apps, Websites and Software is fading. Here is a good example: certain websites you visit on the phone, you can ‘add to homescreen’. This adds an icon of the website and makes it available even when you offline. (Here is good starting point if you want to learn more about this technology: Progressive Web Apps).

So what is it now? An App or a website? How can you access a website that is offline?

For the sake of simplicity we’ll say that everything is accessed via a browser, is a website. (Except for PDF files, Video files, etc.)

What was Webdesign?

The header is in past tense. Webdesign is loosing it’s value in some sense. The rise of many JavaScript Frameworks made it easy for everyone to create good looking and fast websites. This eliminates the need to hire a web designer to sketch your site from scratch.

Certain plugins go even a step further and give you finished and multi-functional User Interface Elements (for example a Button). You can read more on such frameworks here: Top 3 UI Frameworks.

So, where you start?

If you are starting your developer journey in 2020, you should feel blessed. You’ll receive advanced programming language and tons and tons of tutorials and cheap (but not always good) courses. Following lines assume that you want to know how to become a Frontend developer.

We’ll also assume that you don’t want to become a Frontend developer just for the sake of becoming of Frontend developer. The motivation behind this is mainly to earn money. Then comes fun and enjoyment. We do not distinguish whether you make money via a wage or freelance work.

In the end it all comes down to fulfilling the demand (for in Frontend development) with your supply of this skill.

– Me

Web Dev Basics

Every Website on the these two most basic technologies: HTML5 and CSS.

HTML5 equals to Hyper Text Markup Language 5. It’s the standard markup language for virtually every Website. HTML elements are the most basic elements of an HTML page.

CSS equals to Cascading Style Sheets. CSS takes the UI Elements that were created by HTML and adds some style to them – making our website beautiful and modern.

Modern Websites for Beginners

With the goal of making money and having fun as a newcomer to Frontend Development in mind, i introduce to you a very popular and easy to learn JavaScript Framework: Vue.js 2. There are many JS Frameworks that exist along Vue.js. The reason why Vue.js is so popular among Beginners, is that it is easy to learn. And while it’s easy to learn, it doesn’t compromise the important characteristics like scaling, performance, tests, automation, and so on. In short: it’s just perfect.

How to learn it? Well, some people prefer skimming through the docs and learn via trial&error. Others prefer a more focused and directed learning with Courses.

How to learn Vue.js 2

We at German IT Academy put our soul into our courses and hope that you learn a lot in a short period of time while having fun. Without further ado, we present you our Vue.js 2 Online Course:

This Vue.js 2 Course is an Online on-demand Course. Meaning you can watch it whenever you want, on whatever device you want. This Course has reading materials, it has Videos, it has Questions and you get to practice with real code on your Computer.

You’ll start with installing some basic Software that you need to develop a website. We’ll guide you through this process. If something doesn’t work out, you can call us and ask. You end this course with the skill of creating fast and modern Websites.

Your Journey as a Frontend Developer starts with this Vue.js 2 Course

– Me again

If you have any questions about the course, don’t hesitate to email or call us (+49 163 7152337) – we speak Russian, German & English.

Laravel 6 – Build Your First Laravel Application

Laravel 6 – Build Your First Laravel Application

Introduction

Laravel is a powerful MVC PHP framework. From official docs “Laravel is a web application framework with expressive, elegant syntax”. You must’ve heard about Laravel if you’ve ever worked with PHP. Laravel has experienced major growth since it’s initial release in 2011. Laravel was created by Taylor Otwell. It became the most starred PHP framework on GitHub in 2015.

My goal with this article is to create a guide for those who just want to learn Laravel and explore PHP. This article will not cover every small detail about Laravel but will be enough to get you started with Laravel 6.

Prerequisites

  • You should be familiar with HTML, CSS & most important Object-Oriented programming with PHP 7
  • A local PHP environment (Valet, Homestead, Vagrant, XAMP, LAMP, etc.)
  • A database (MySQL, SQLite etc.)
  • Composer
  • Node & NPM installed and updated

Note: For local environment I’ll be using LAMP (Linux Apache MySQL PHP) as there are no pre-configured environment like Homestead or Valet available for Linux. You can use Homestead for windows or Valet if you’re a Mac user.

I’ll explain how to create a new Laravel 6 application just as I would in real world environment. So let’s get started.

Planning

You must plan any project before coding it out. Planning a project before implementation is a major factor in its success. It doesn’t matter how you plan a project. You can plan it on Paper, whiteboard or some simple text file. You can also use Trello for planning out all the components you’re going to create in the project.

Today, we are going to create a Contact Book app. So let’s talk about goals of it.

  1. Display all contacts in a list.
  2. Create a form where people can add new contact.
  3. Validate the form.
  4. Insert the data into the database.

Get Started

Let’s create a brand-new Laravel project. I like to put all my projects in Development directory. Open your terminal and navigate to this directory.

mkdir Development
cd Development

Next, let’s install Laravel’s command line installer.

composer global require "laravel/installer"

Now, create a new Laravel project.

laravel new ContactBook

This will create a new directory at Development/ContactBook and install a stock Laravel app.

Navigate to newly created directory and run Laravel server by

cd ContactBook
php artisan serve

You’ll get this output, open your browser and navigate to given address.

Default Laravel Homepage

Hurray! You’ve successfully installed default Laravel application.

Laravel 6 Environment File

Let’s open this newly created project in Editor. You can use any editor or IDE of your choice. My personal favorite IDE for Laravel development is PhpStorm. Now open .env (Environment) file.

Laravel environment file

Here, you can set different environment variables. You can change the name of the app by editing ‘APP_NAME’. The main part here is ‘DB_*’ variables. You can set different database by specifying driver name. Here you can also set SMTP details.

Setting up Authentication

Laravel made it very easy to enable Login/Registration functionality. In this tutorial, it’s not mandatory to set up authentication, so you can skip this part if you want to.

Laravel’s laravel/ui package provides a quick way to scaffold all the routes and views you need for authentication using a few simple commands:

composer require laravel/ui --dev
php artisan ui bootstrap --auth
npm install && npm run dev

This command will install a layout view, registration and login views, as well as routes for all authentication end-points. A HomeController will also be generated to handle post-login requests to your application’s dashboard.

With the basics set up and working, it’s time to start doing some coding.

Building a Contact List

Building a whole finished project is quite overwhelming, so it’s better if we divide our project in small parts. So let’s start with displaying a list of contacts. It may sound a small task but it still requires a database, table, view and query.

So let’s create a migration. We can create a migration by using Laravel artisan command line tool.

php artisan make:migration create_contact_books_table --create=contact_books

This command will create a new migration file database/migrations/{{datetime}}_create_contact_books_table.php

The file contains two methods: up and down. We’re interested in the up method for now. Add following columns in up method.

Schema::create('contact_books', function (Blueprint $table) {
            $table->bigIncrements('id');
            $table->string('name');
            $table->string('phone')->unique();
            $table->text('description');
            $table->timestamps();
        });

Save it and run the migration by using following command.

php artisan migrate

Now, we’re going to need a model and some dummy data to work with our database. Laravel provides database seeder to populate table with dummy data and a factory class to generate dummy data.

php artisan make:model --factory ContactBook

This command will create a new Contact model. The --factory flag will generate a new factory file. Our newly created factory file will reside in database/factories. Open the ContactFactory.php file and fill the following:

$$factory->define(ContactBook::class, function (Faker $faker) {
    return [
        'name' => $faker->name,
        'phone' => $faker->phoneNumber,
        'description' => $faker->paragraph,
    ];
});

Now, let’s create a database seeder for contacts.

php artisan make:seeder ContactBookTableSeeder

This command will create a new seeder for our contact book table. Open the seeder file by going to database/seeds/ContactBookTableSeeder.php. Now paste the following in it.

 public function run()
 {
     factory(App\ContactBook::class, 5)->create();
 }

To activate the following, navigate to database/seeds/DatabaseSeeder.php. Now paste the following in it.

public function run()
{
     $this->call(ContactBookTableSeeder::class);
}

Now, run the migration and seed the tables by running the following command.

php artisan migrate:fresh --seed

We have successfully generated fake data for our app! Now we’re ready to create a new view to display a list of Contacts.

Routes & Views

Now it’s time to provide new routes to display a form to add new contact and list existing contacts. We can add new routes to our application in the routes/web.php file.

Here, we can create necessary routes for our app. Laravel provides a default route. To create a new route, we can either use dedicated controller class or closure. For sake of simplicity we’re going to use closure in our app.

Now, let’s update the home route to show all contacts from database table.

Route::get('/', function () {
    $contacts = App\ContactBook::all();

    return view('welcome', ['contacts' => $contacts]);
});

Here, in second argument we’re passing an array of contacts to our view welcome.

Next, edit the welcome.blade.php view to display our list of contacts.

<div class="content">
    <div class="col-md-12 mt-5 mb-5">
        <div class="text-center mb-3">
             <h3>Contact Book</h3>
        </div>
        <table class="table table-striped table-bordered table-dark">
            <thead>
               <tr>
                 <th width="20%">Contact Name</th>
                 <th width="20%">Phone Number</th>
                 <th>Description</th>
               </tr>
            </thead>
            <tbody>
            @foreach ($contacts as $contact)
              <tr>
                 <td>{{ $contact->name }}</td>
                 <td>{{ $contact->phone }}</td>
                 <td>{{ $contact->description }}</td>
              </tr>
            @endforeach
            </tbody>
        </table>
   </div>
</div>

Refresh the page in your browser.

All Contacts, listed in a table

New Contact Form

Now, it’s time to add a new form so user can add their own contacts in our table. To do that, first create a new route in our web.php file.

Route::get('/add', function (){
   return view('add');
});

Next, create a new view add.blade.php in our views folder. Add the following code in it.

@extends('layouts.app')
@section('content')
    <div class="container">
        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-md-6 offset-3">
                <div class="card">
                    <div class="card-header">
                        <h3>Add Contact</h3>
                    </div>
                    <div class="card-body">
                        <form action="/insert" method="post">
                            @csrf
                            <div class="form-group{{ $errors->has('name') ? ' has-error' : ''}}">
                                <label for="name">Name</label>
                                <input type="text" class="form-control" id="name" name="name" 
                                  placeholder="Name" value="{{ old('name') }}">
                                @if($errors->has('name'))
                                    <span class="help-block">{{ $errors->first('name') }}</span>
                                @endif
                            </div>
                            <div class="form-group{{ $errors->has('phone') ? ' has-error':'' }}">
                                <label for="phone">Phone</label>
                                <input type="text" class="form-control" id="phone" name="phone" 
                                 placeholder="Phone" value="{{ old('phone') }}">
                                @if($errors->has('phone'))
                                    <span class="help-block">{{ $errors->first('phone') }}</span>
                                @endif
                            </div>
                            <div class="form-group{{ $errors->has('description') ?' has- 
                             error':''}}">
                                <label for="description">Description</label>
                                <textarea class="form-control" id="description" 
                                  name="description"
                                  placeholder="description">{{ old('description') }}</textarea>
                                @if($errors->has('description'))
                                <span class="help-block">{{ $errors->first('description') </span>
                                @endif
                            </div>
                            <button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Add</button>
                        </form>
                    </div>
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
@endsection

This will create a new form with 3 fields, name, phone and description. The form action is ‘/insert’ which we will next. Laravel require to send a csrf token with any type of form submission, so we’ve also included @csrf. This will create a hidden field with a random csrf token.

Navigate to ‘/add’ in your browser, you’ll see something like this.

Handling form submission

Now, with the form is created we can start working on our insert route, to handle the form submission. Open routes file and add the following.

use Illuminate\Http\Request;

Route::post('/insert', function (Request $request) {
    $data = $request->validate([
        'name' => 'required|max:100',
        'phone' => 'required|max:30',
        'description' => 'required|max:255',
    ]);

    $contact = tap(new App\ContactBook($data))->save();

    return redirect('/');
});

This route is a little complicated than others so let’s walk through it.

First, we are injecting the Illuminate\Http\Request object, which holds the POST data and other data about the request.

Next, we use the request’s validate() method to validate the form data. The validated fields are returned to the $data variable, and we can use them to populate our model.

We require all three fields, and using the pipe character; we can define multiple rules. If validation fails, an exception is thrown, and the route returns the user with the original input data and validation errors.

Next, we use the tap() helper function to create a new ContactBook model instance and then save it. Using tap allows us to call save() and still return the model instance after the save.

Now allow our model to populate given data, we’ve to specify “fillable” properties. Open ContactBook model and add the following.

class ContactBook extends Model
{
    protected $fillable = [
        'name',
        'phone',
        'description'
    ];
}

Now, let’s test this in our browser. Navigate to /add and submit the form with proper data.

Filling data in form
Our New Contact added to the bottom of the contact list

Conclusion

Congratulations, you’ve created your first Laravel 6 app. This article was designed to get you started on building your app, and you can use this as a building block to gain the skills you need to develop your application.

I hope you liked this article. Subscribe to our mailing list for more articles by me. Have a great day!

How to create a WordPress Plugin

How to create a WordPress Plugin

Introduction

What is WordPress? A technical definition is “WordPress is an open source content management system (CRM) built in PHP”. Currently WordPress is the most popular CRM available for free! If you’ve ever used WordPress, you definitely know about themes & plugins in WordPress! In this article I will show you how to create a simple WordPress plugin in less than 15 minutes! But first, let’s talk more about what a plugin actually is.

Take a look at our fresh PHP 7 Introduction.

What is a WordPress Plugin?

WordPress plugin is a package of PHP script(s) that can alter your website. A plugin can alter your website in many ways i.e. From adding a simple message in header to creating a whole shop on your website eg. WooCommerce. Plugins can also modify/tweak existing features of your website like changing Login, sending email on specific event etc.

WordPress theme or Plugin?

If you have ever opened a WordPress theme, you’ll know that every theme contains a function.php file. This file contains all the theme related logic and any functionality provided by a particular theme. You can modify this file and add your own custom functionality too. So if we can directly add new feature in function.php, why do we need a plugin? Well the answer is simple, if you only want to add some text in the header or something small like that, you can surely use theme’s function.php. If you want something like a custom chat bot or anything like that, then a plugin would better suit your needs.

The main difference between a theme’s ‘function.php’ and separate plugin is that plugin’s functionality persists regardless of your website’s current theme but any changes from function.php will only be applicable when that particular theme is in use.

Creating our first WordPress Plugin

WordPress plugin’s default structure only requires one PHP file in a separate directory with a PHP block comment containing various data about that plugin. So, to create a plugin you need to navigate to your wp-content/plugins folder. Create a new folder name myFirstPlugin. Inside this new folder create a new file named myfirstplugin.php. Open the created file in any text editor of your choice and paste the following in it.

<?php
/*
Plugin Name: My First Plugin
Plugin URI: http://mywebsite.com/
description: My first ever WordPress plugin
Version: 1.0
Author: Arman Khan
Author URI: https://instagram.com/codingwitharman
License: GPL2
*/

Here, only Plugin Name is required, but it’s a good practice to provide as much data as possible about our plugin.

That’s it!! You’ve created your first ever WordPress plugin. You can log in to your wp-admin and go to plugins and active this plugin. Of course, this plugin does not do anything, yet! But it is an active plugin.

How to create a great plugin?

There are some parameters that you should consider while creating your plugin. These parameters will help you create a successful well documented plugin.

Plugin Structure

How to structure your plugin? Well, this question is quite common among new WordPress developers.

If your plugin provides complex functionality, you should divide it in multiple files. For example, if your plugin has a main class, you should put that in your plugin’s main file and provide connections to other files through it. If your plugin includes UI related files, you should consider sorting them in separate folders like JS/CSS/Images and put all these folders in one assets folder. Well of course this is not a requirement from WordPress but a good plugin structure is always preferred compared to a bad one.

Naming Convention

When creating functions in the plugin, you should be very careful naming them. You should never choose more general names for your functions as it might clash with other plugins that have similar functionalities.

The most common solution is to use unique prefix. For example, if your function name is commonFunction then you should replace it with something like ak_commonFunction.

Helper Hooks

WordPress offers three hooks for custom plugins.

register_activation_hook()

This hook allows you to create a function that runs when your plugin is activated. You can use this hook to load dependencies, check for plugin version or check for WordPress or PHP version.

register_deactivation_hook()

This hook when your plugin is deactivated. You can use this hook to un-load dependencies, remove settings etc.

register_uninstall_hook()

This function runs when a WordPress administrator delete your plugin from backend. This is a great way to remove plugin specific data like tables in database or custom field created by your plugin.

Wrap Up

Well, so now you know how to create a simple WordPress plugin. Now you can easily follow articles that require you to create WordPress plugin first. Of course this guide does not contain advance features that a plugin can provide, we’ll cover those topics in future articles for sure. Stay tuned!

Complete Vue.js 3 Guide

Complete Vue.js 3 Guide

Last updated: 24.12.2019

We at German IT Academy are very eager to see first official release of the third Version of Vue.js 3. Therefore we are watching the developments closely and will be publishing many Posts, Tutorials & Courses on Vue.js 3. It does pay off to be on our Newsletter list (scroll down to subscribe) or check this Vue.js 3 Guide once i a while.

Also, check out the first “awesome-vue3″ repository with an updated and curated list of all resources regarding Vue.js 3.

Currently the vuejs team is working on three projects: the 2.7 Version, Maintenance of current codebase and the Roadmap (mainly the third version of Vue.js).

Major Changes in Vue.js 3

Let’s explore the official plans for third Version of Vue.js. We will also derive a great lot of content from the vue/rfcs, where all the RFCs are developed and discussed (Note: RFC = Request For Comment). We picked some of the most interesting ones and included a basic code example. As the changes become more certain, we will update our Vue.js 3 Guide to have more detailed examples.

Official RFCs December 2019

Composition API

There is a long explanation of what the Composition API is. Generally, the motivation behind it is the reuse of Logic, better Code Structure and better Type Inference. Here is a basic Example:

<template>
  <button @click="increment">
    Count is: {{ state.count }}, double is: {{ state.double }}
  </button>
</template>

<script>
import { reactive, computed } from 'vue'

export default {
  setup() {
    const state = reactive({
      count: 0,
      double: computed(() => state.count * 2)
    })

    function increment() {
      state.count++
    }

    return {
      state,
      increment
    }
  }
}
</script>

New syntax for scoped slots usage

  • New directive v-slot that unifies slot and slot-scope in a single directive syntax.
  • Shorthand for v-slot that can potentially unify the usage of both scoped and normal slots.
<!-- default slot -->
<foo v-slot="{ msg }">
  {{ msg }}
</foo>

<!-- named slot -->
<foo>
  <template v-slot:one="{ msg }">
    {{ msg }}
  </template>
</foo>

Shorthand syntax for the v-slot syntax

<foo>
  <template #header="{ msg }">
    Message from header: {{ msg }}
  </template>

   <template #footer>
    A static footer
  </template>
</foo>

Dynamic values in directive arguments

<div v-bind:[key]="value"></div>
<div v-on:[event]="handler"></div>

# instead of

<div v-bind="{ [key]: value }"></div>
<div v-on="{ [event]: handler }"></div>

Global API

Currently in 2.x, all global APIs are exposed on the single Vue object:

import Vue from 'vue'

Vue.nextTick(() => {})

const obj = Vue.observable({})

In 3.x, they can only be accessed as named imports:

import Vue, { nextTick, observable } from 'vue'

Vue.nextTick // undefined

nextTick(() => {})

const obj = observable({})

Re-design app bootstrapping and global API

Global APIs that globally mutate Vue’s behavior are now moved to app instances created the new createApp method, and their effects are now scoped to that app instance only.

// Before
import Vue from 'vue'
import App from './App.vue'

Vue.config.ignoredElements = [/^app-/]
Vue.use(/* ... */)
Vue.mixin(/* ... */)
Vue.component(/* ... */)
Vue.directive(/* ... */)

new Vue({
  render: h => h(App)
}).$mount('#app')


// After
import { createApp } from 'vue'
import App from './App.vue'

const app = createApp()

app.config.ignoredElements = [/^app-/]
app.use(/* ... */)
app.mixin(/* ... */)
app.component(/* ... */)
app.directive(/* ... */)

app.mount(App, '#app')

More Material on Vue.js 3

  • Github Repository ‘awesome-vue3‘ with a compilation of most recent and most popular Vue.js 3 Resources.
IT Career Path Nobody Is Discussing

IT Career Path Nobody Is Discussing

Whatever path you decide on, we will help you find out the ideal things to do to take. Your career path contains the jobs you should hit your final career objective. While the career path will appear different for everybody, aiming to acquire equal parts experience in company and technology is your safest bet. For that reason, it’s essential you select the ideal career path to ensure it’s authentic to who you are.

Nuance of IT Career Path

For midmarket CIOs, it’s an incredibly exciting prospect for them to not only grow their careers but also to make a great deal of money,” Banerji explained. Information Technology (IT) careers are predicted to experience significant growth during the present decade. When you’re ready to take that very first step into your new IT career you will begin with the fundamentals.

Roadmap for IT Career Path

One particular tangible way to begin your career change is by way of freelance or part-time work. As soon as you have decided that a career change is certainly the way forward, there’s still a lot you will need to think about. Making a career change is just one of the toughest job-search challenges. Career change, as soon as you have decided that a career change is certainly the way forward, there’s still a lot you will need to think about. Whether the career change is voluntary or involuntary, individuals may experience a number of emotions like fear, anxiety, or a feeling of loss. Tons of individuals wonder whether making a significant career change is well worth it.

The Foolproof IT Career Path Strategy

Figure out if career change is appropriate for you and how to change careers. Irrespective of where you currently are in your career, there are a couple of things you can begin doing to increase your odds of a thriving future IT career path. Another way to go into a career in information technology is to make a college degree. Online Courses are a quicker way though. In addition you get the most up to date skills.

You are able to still receive the job. You can proceed and apply for jobs that you believe you’d enjoy, whether you’ve got the requirements listed in the work ad or not. Simply perusing books about the market, in addition to specific topics like programming and networking, can help you explore the range of work in the area.

Growing & Goal

Much like any goal, it can help to define where you wish to go and a path to get there. It’s possible to segue from just about any career path into any other. You’re able to pursue a few different, new career paths simultaneously.

As you grow, however, the path forward can come to be not as clear. A career path provides the employee a feeling of direction, a way to evaluate career progress, and career targets and milestones. Before you go out and select a career path, it’s imperative that you take the opportunity to figure out what success means to you. Whichever way a career path takes someone, it’s intended to provide greater satisfaction of a worker’s career values and requires by targeting a string of jobs created to receive them to their career objective. Other career paths are indirect and could involve work in various industries or kinds of jobs, including when someone is working on a career change.